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forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
host, the taliban, in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it's too early to tell for certain, initial evidence suggests we have halted the taliban insurgency in the heartland of helmand province. mr. speaker, we are now entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces more training and mentoring. as president obama said in his address last month, the mission is changing from combat to support. when we arrived, there was no one to hand over to, no proper army, no police force. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. mr. speaker, success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure that the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. now, i know there have been well-known problems, especially, with the afghan po
in a helicopter crash after a firefight with taliban drug traffickers that also claimed the lives of seven serviceman. on october29th, 2009, the remains of dea special agents forest lehman, chad michael, michael westin, and the fallen united states service members were met by president obama at dover air force base. he honored the men and paid his respects at the dignified transfer ceremony. co-chairman grassley and i wish to convene our deepest condolences to the families of these dea agents that gave their lives fighting narcotics trafficking in afghanistan and hereby enter their obituaries into the record for today's hearing. its hard i think for both of us to realize that we have people who carry out these missions and get killed carrying out these missions, and they do our country great service, and not much is said about it. but this committee wants everyone to know that we very much appreciate that service and we certainly honor it in the best way we can. so i would now like to turn to my co-chairman, senator grassley, for his opening statement. >> thank you for honoring the memory
experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there i
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
, taliban and others got strength and found terrorist center and now we're involved in a war that involves the future of the world, not just peace for the world, but american peace as well. indeed, i would be very caution as we go about -- cautious as we go about suggesting that we automatically walk away from the commander in chief's plan. indeed if we are not careful, the vacuum will catch up with us and america will find itself in a much broader and a much more intense struggle. with that i yield back the balance of my time. >> would the gentleman yield? the chair: the gentleman yields back? for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. cohen: thank you. before i yield to my colleague from california to respond, i would like to mention, i appreciated mr. lewis' history, but i would suggest to you that al qaeda could have found a base in yemen, they could have found a base in the sudan, they could have found a base in other places. there was nothing particularly unique about afghani
where we are training security forces and where we are working to provide stability against the taliban and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan -- that perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going to reconstruction projects when our track record really stings. i hope you all will convince me i am too cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. and i want to tell you, i am looking for good news and i hope we hear some today. there are too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road, and then i look of the projects we are doing in afghanistan and it is very hard to explain to them why we can't fix that the road because we can't afford it -- yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that were clearly not sustainable. and anybody spend any time thinking about it in the first place we would realize that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. senator portman is here. i will give him a time to get
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
not the one he promised to do sometimes, to ban this organization? >> we have taken action against the taliban and we are looking closely at the boat. what they have said goes well beyond what a legal organization should say. >> given that the former labor pensions minister has said the current tensions -- would you agree that this is unacceptable for a small minority of unions to be disrupting the position tomorrow for thousands of people across the country? >> clearly, this is the issue. they simply do not want to talk about this. this is a small minority of unions that have gone ahead with action. i think that we are proposing is fair. you make the point that this was a former labor minister who has written a very good report, but say that as we live longer, we will have to contribute more to the public sector pensions, let me stress. the reason we do this is to safeguard the defined benefit systems for the future. there is a contract between the public sector workers, and we will support you in old age but this must be sustainable. >> is the prime minister aware of the concerns about the r
to provide stability against taliban and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda on the border of pakistan and afghanistan. perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going for reconstruction projects when our track record really stings when it comes to reconstruction projects. i hope that you all will convince me that i have become cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. i am looking for good news, and i hope we hear some today. but i think it is time for a guest check because i have too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road? then i look at the practice we are building in afghanistan and it is hard to explain to them why we cannot fix that road. because we cannot afford it, but yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that are not sustainable. if anybody had spent time thinking about it in the first place, they would have realized that. that kind of accountability has to be present. i am pleased that we have a number of witnesses today that are going to testify to contracting
explosives and cargo planes bound for the united states. it was the taliban and pakistan s sent a man on a failed attempt to blow up an suv in times square. it is a al qaeda is in here adherents,individuals, sometimes with little or no physical contact to al qaeda had succumbed to its hateful ideology and have a engaged in or facilitated terrorist activities in the united states. these misguided individuals are spurred on by the likes of -- -- we have seen the tragic results of that military murder and the attack in fort hood did this is the first counterterrorism strategy that focuses on the ability of rocket and its networks to inspire people to attack us -- of al qaeda and its networks to inspire people to attack us from within. president obama have made it a priority to renew american leadership in the world, strengthening our alliances, deepening partnerships. al qaeda seeks to make america look like an enemy to the world's most and -- world's muslim. al qaeda 6 to bleed as financially by dryness into a long drawn-out wars that inflame -- seeks to lead us financially by driving u
in the beginning? >> ps. >> afghanistan made sense after 9/11. the taliban -- it makes sense to invade then. that way.t now appear >> what is your take on marijuana? what is to be legal. -- it should be legal. >> abortion laws? >> i am in favor of a woman's right to choose. right to choose. comments. anti-ga these are not involved in this. we are in control of our bodies. a portio abortion will continue. >> the department of education? >> they came on line in 79 or 80. they have had no clear up that an educational results. this is an arguable if you look at the national assessment of progress. seniors living high school have the same scores they had in the early '70s. that sinn make everybody think about giving up and going home and starting a school. >> federal money for politicians to run? >> it is quite possibly more disturbing to me than federal money for churches. money for churches. the american experiment to a complete failure appeared >> social security? >> i think social security is a plan that has run its course. i would be in favor. i think there is a tax on the social safety net
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
that is capable of withstanding the radical taliban and other elements. one of my questions, madam chair, is going to be questioning the sustainability of the efforts. congress has appropriated over $60 billion for relief and reconstruction in afghanistan. the great majority of which has been channeled through private contractors. we know from experience in bosnia in the 1990's and more recently in iraq that a reduction in troop levels as not mean a drop in contractor activity. in some cases, it is a matter of increase. there has been increase reliance on contractors to fulfill the logistical roles once performed by the military in those instances. eventually, the contractor presence will also decrease as we move support of large-scale off-budget scanned it -- spending to more direct to the afghan government directly. this is why our reconstruction strategy must focus on insuring that afghans can sustain what we have helped build. how many additional schools and health, as we can construct, but also that there are teachers and health care officials to sustain those institutions. whether afghans ha
a special personal interest in defeating the taliban. and afghanistan as a whole had seen how evil the taliban was. how much damage they could do to society as they burned paintings and books and films and totally suppressed freedom in afghanistan. they knew. these people were evil but they were afraid of them but with the united states weaponry, with our guidance and intelligence training these people defeated the taliban. what i was not aware of until we met with these folks and turns out i could have been aware, i just was not, but do you the research, you find out, the bush administration convinced the northern alliance, ok, now that you've whipped the taliban you need to totally disarm. because we're the united states and we're here and we'll make sure nothing happens to you again. well, the northern alliance messed up because they trusted us and they turned in their weapons, i asked one, you turned in all your weapons? well, apparently they have some small arms, but nothing that would allow them to take on the taliban again. naturally these people were concerned because they
activities in support of al qaeda or taliban operations. we certainly would deem them to be participating in hostilities against us. moreover, the language of the war powers resolution clearly encompasses the kind of operations u.s. military forces are performing in support of other nato countries. these concerns are compounded by indications that the administration's legal position was the result of a disputed decision process. according to press reports, the president made the decision to adopt this position without the department just as having the opportunity to develop a unified legal opinion. it is regrettable that the administration has refused our request to make witnesses from the department of defense and justice available for today's hearing. one would expect the administration to be fully forthcoming on consultations about libya to compensate in some measure for the lack of congressional authorization to the war. consultations in no way substitute for formal authorization, they serve a vital purpose in unifying the government and providing congress with a basis for decision-ma
of international troops. i hope we can all agree that the taliban has morphed into a hybrid. it is one part terrorist organization and one part global drug trafficking organization. for the past today years, virtually every heroin processing lab raided by the dea, special forces, and afghan police has ties to the taliban. what they find is not only large quantities of opium and heroin, but also improvised explosive devices, bomb making materials, and taliban training manuals. in one raid last year, 2056 pounds of high-grade heroin with a wholesale value of $56 million was seized. experts agree it may take many years to get the drug trade in afghanistan under control. as the military begins to scale back its presence this month, i think we have got to ensure that our civilians continue to support counternarcotics efforts in afghanistan. that is really important. a year ago this month, this caucus released a bipartisan report that contained several policy recommendations. i like to highlight the progress being made and what remains to be done. first, the good news. the caucus recommended incr
associated allies, especially the taliban, of course. he also felt like there had been progress in developing and training the afghan national security forces, the army and the national police, especially in the past year-and-a-half. still a long way to go. he did not make any comments specifically yesterday about the killing of ahmad karzai. he let those comments to the white house. it expressed regret and condemn the assassination of president karzai's half-brothers. i think there is concern generally that there could be some instability, beahmad wali karzai in its prominent position in canada are what ikan -- kandahar, he was a key figure in keeping control there. that may have been more of a concern a year ago before the u.s. had managed to reclaim control of that area with its afghan allies and partners on the ground. so there may not be as much ramification now as there might have been a year ago. still there is likely to be jockeying for position and power among the local forces there. host: finally, the defense secretary did not cut a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk abou
on with the taliban. do you feel the taliban should be part of afghanistan going forward? guest: the reconciliation is one of the major national programs our government already initiated. we have agreed with our international partners to have this reconciliation program. our president a couple of weeks back mentioned talks with different people going on through different channels. we have a high peace council the mainly responsible for the reconciliation. they have opened to the channel of communications. when you want to reconcile with people, you have to talk to them and open the channels for communication. there are different channels that want to reach out to opposition forces for the success of the reconciliation program. host: what about separating the taliban and al qaeda? guest: this is an afghan national program. is supported by the international community. our partners are saying it is an afghan-led reconciliation program. the afghans should be in the driving seat. we have three principles for that. the first one is to cut ties with al qaeda. the second one is to renounce violence. the th
forces. all we are training are evental new members of the taliban. trainers are doing a wonderful job, but we don't have the time to make an army. every day, some one dice. every day, an american dice or gets his or her -- dies or gets his or her legs poster. this was in the newspaper. and too many times as we debate and eloquent speakers on the floor of the house, we don't see any faces or broken arms or legs and here is a young lady holding a young baby in her arms and the little baby is looking at the officer who is presenting her with the flag. how often does this happen throughout america and we never see it? we have to bring our toops home. they were asked to do everything, to get al qaeda that was responsible for 9/11 and get bin laden. we have done all that. we have done everything we can do. and as my friend from massachusetts said, $10 billion a month and we can't fix the schools or fix the roads here in north carolina and throughout america. i'm from north carolina. i know what's happening to my state and i know what's happening to the other states. mr. speaker, it is time
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
sense after 9/11 to hunt down bin laden. he was clearly there, the taliban refused to cough him up. i think it made sense to invade. it does not make sense to be there now a decade later, or more, with not even a clear withdrawal plan. >> what's your take on marijuana? >> marijuana is -- should be legal and it -- it should be as legal and acceptable as booze. >> abortion laws. >> abortion laws, i'm in favor of a woman's right to choose and i think that whenever your take on abortion, and i'd say maybe 30 percent of libertarians are very, very anti-abortion, because they believe that the fetus, at least, at a certain point deserves the rights that everybody else has. government funding should not be involved in abortion but more to the point, we are at the very early stages of actually controlling our bodies, our biology, our reproduction. i think abortion is becoming less and less important to public discourse and will continue to, as we develop more control over how -- how and under what circumstances we have children. >> the department of education. >> the federal department of educ
of defense dollars are going to afghanistan. we were out of the taliban out of power. karzai stood for free elections in 2004. al qaeda was dismantled and settled in waziristan and pakistan. this is not a nation-building exercise. this encounter terror exercise. we do not need 100,000 troops on the ground at the cost we are paying today in order to get the job done. [applause] and i am here to tell you that the future of the u.s. is not going to be determined in the prairies of afghanistan. the future of the u.s., whether you want to recognize it or not, is going to be determined by how well prepared we are to compete in a highly competitive 20th -- 20 per century, and that battle is going to be waged across the -- 21st century, and that battle is going to be waged across the ocean. as you walk off of this building, i want you to remember why we are in this race. it is about the generation behind us and the condition they will find our nation in. it is totally unsustainable, the debt trajectory that we are on. and number two, the reality of launching a new industrial revolution, it is withi
was announcing to the taliban the day you were going to withdraw. while they might not have watches, they do have calendars. it makes it difficult to negotiate with someone or to drive them away if they know that only have to hide for a certain time and then can come back because you are gone. i think that was a mistake. i think it was a mistake not to oversee the elections, the government elections, to make sure they were held in a way that had public confidence in a government that was not corrupt. i think there are some lessons learned. we have been there 10 years. it is time for the afghan people to take responsibility for preserving the independence which has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. our men and women have made extraordinary sacrifices there, and other places in the history of this great nation. we want to see the afghans pick up the responsibility for the effort that goes forward. the determination of when to pull our troops out should come with the input of the generals and the leaders on the ground. i think the president should listen more to them, as david cameron di
radio address, and she addressed the issue of the impression of the taliban -- the oppression of the taliban on women and girls in afghanistan and she has since then focused on women's and girls issues related to the challenges in afghanistan. so it wasn't something that she intended to focus on when she went to the white house in 2001, but certainly the course of history changed all of that, and she has really immersed herself in finding a way to make a difference in women's and girls lives around the world, and she's taken the opportunity to speak all around the world to issues important to her and to the community. >> noriel rodriguez, i noticed at the nurenl palm desert, california that both ross lynn carter and cokie roberts talked about kind of the sisterhood of first ladies and all the first ladies that showed up and barbra bush will be there in grand rapids today. is there an informal sisterhood of some type among first ladies? >> i think there is. it's really a very small club. there atlanta many people who have the opportunity to serve as first lady, and betty ford
happen in kandahar province, which is the real former stronghold of the taliban. he has a lot of enemies, both among the insurgency and also among the various criminal networks that work in that area. he himself has been accused of drug ties, criminal ties, and even of being on the payroll of the cia. all things that ahmad wali karzai denies. he has a very murky reputation. it's hard to know, even though the taliban claims responsibility, what happened and who is behind it. host: how does the u.s. view him? guest: the u.s. has most recently seen him as an unsolvable problem. he has been a friend to the u.s. for a long time. because he has been someone who has been hard to bring on board with some of the programs to develop the province, to work with the military -- no one says this directly, granted, because he is a relative of hamid karzai. in private talks, u.s. officials would say they do not know exactly how to handle him. at the same time, he was also someone who was exerting a certain amount of control over the area and able to pass by areas that may not have otherwise been passed
seen pakistani police officers be shot down in a massacre by taliban. this is a very serious climate of terrorism in this world. and the tragedy and backdrop of 9/11, where we had to bail out the airlines and rebuild new york and other places, that is the responsibility of america. that's why there is a federal government. and if we are to play with this through the cap, cut and balance, balanced budget amendment, we will be the tap dance, we will be the losers' club and we will bust the rights of americans that call upon their federal government when they are in need. this is not a time to play with the lives of americans. and i believe that we are ready to compromise, but not to engage in this when we have to do what the american people need us to do. and i want to yield back to the gentlelady and i'm very glad to be here with her tonight and i couldn't leave without emphasizing that homeland security cannot be undermined and diminished. it is streamly important. let's do right by the american people. mrs. christensen: i yield back. the chair: under the speaker's policy of january
salary cuts. host: let's take a look at some other stories. u.s. cash said to be reaching the taliban, yearlong military that investigation concluded u.s. taxpayer money has been indirectly funneled to the taliban under 2.1 $6 billion transportation contacted the u.s. has funded in part to promote afghan business. another piece in international news, the u.s. has invited a north korean official to new york for talks. the vice foreign minister will visit for a rare meeting that could pave the way for resumption of multinational denuclearization talks secretary of state clinton said on sunday. and politics, congressman wu faces calls to step down print reports the democratic u.s. representative and the portland, oregon area, calls for his resignation from some in his own party after the state's largest newspaper published reports this week in of an alleged unwanted advances in november by a mr.wu for the young, california woman, the daughter of a longtime supporter. one last jury in politics from the washington times politics section, dnc targeting hispanic votes with 8 spanishad. both
the united states have been using against the taliban and outside appear tonight, we have new evidence that this confidence is simply wrong. part of this was the chill in relations between pakistan and washington. >> it has always been a secret war, if you like, conducted by the cia in pakistan using these unmanned aircraft. if one looks at the history of it, one could see howard rounds up, but there are questions in the wake of the raid. the vast majority have been carried out in so-called tribal areas on the border with afghanistan there. over the years, the number has gone up steadily. the first few years of the strike 2004 to 2007, just a handful, and we see it going up. 2010, under the obama administration, really rising. but a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year. 45 so far this year. pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted to stop here they ordered the cia out of an air base in pakistan were some of the raids have been launched. by my reckoning, there have been a dozen sense, so have these been done like the big law the raid itself again
by a battalion. there were no casualties. it was taliban territory it from day one that the u.s. came into -- >> why didn't you do the same thing on this road? >> our experience working on roads in the area indicated that it was not like -- >> once you figured out it was, why didn't you go back to the drawing board and do what you had done in the previous incident? >> senator, i think that is a great question, and my understanding with this hearing is getting to the lessons learned. going back to my opening statement, where i said we cannot just look at the metric of scope schedule budget, there comes a time when we probably should have stepped back and said, we have to change the scope, because we need to get the road and, but maybe there's a different way of getting it done. what ended up happening is we all went into a reactive mode. we had the security situation and had to increase the security of footprint to prevent that particular situation from happening again. from the lessons learned, we had to recognize how the security environment can change relatively quickly in the conti
radio address and she addressed the issue of the taliban and women in afghanistan. she focused on the challenges related in afghanistan. it is not something she intended to focus on when she went to the white house in 2001, but certainly history change the course of all about. she immersed herself and found a way to make a difference in women's lives and girls' lives are on the world. she has taken these opportunities to speak to the communities. host: i noticed yesterday at the funeral in palm desert, calif. that two of the speakers talked about the sisterhood of the first ladies. barbara bush will be there in grand rapids when lynn cheney is speaking to it. is there a sisterhood of the former first ladies? guest: i think there is. it is a very small club. many dead get to serve as first lady. -- there are not many that get to serve as first lady. at the betty ford funeral, they turned out to show their respect. they show that there is a way to be friends and set aside the differences in politics. it was really heartwarming to see rosalynn carter be a part of that service. and
and hold land. that is the measure of the estate of a particular organization. that is true for taliban as it is for any iraqi insurgency group. i think now have an internal safe haven. a lot of our folks have been on the violence. i would like to think sometimes there are areas that have no violence, that is coming up, it does not control it. i think if you look as some of the provinces, these places -- there is an absence of violence. this coming violence is absent, if you will print -- that just a minute pilot is absurd they have with a need to fund, to recruit >> you would say whether it is comparing now to six months or even year ago, he would say that launch anacity to attack, a strike on our homeland has been enhanced as opposed to degraded? >> their capacity to do so has been increased. we responded to the various attacks, more preventive measures. in some cases, going after them. with an industry that is on lockdown, on reduced manning, we're not completely blind we are very much operating in the dusk, almost by time but if we do not have a good understanding, i believe the hou
.s. taxpayer money has been indirectly funneled to the taliban under a $2.16 billion, a $2 billion transportation contract. this is crazy. it should not be part of the job of the u.s. military to promote afghan businesses. this report found, quote, documented credible evidence of involvement in a criminal enterprise of support for the enemy, unquote. this is ridiculous. and it comes on the heels of a report last week that the navy has spent at least $300 million, at least $300 million, on two ships that were never completed, never sent on a mission, and are now headed for a salvage yard in brownsville, texas. are there no fiscal conservatives at the pentagon? and sadly, most people in congress today are afraid to cut the defense department for fear they will appear to be unpatriotic. and yet it seems to me, mr. speaker, that it's unpatriotic to continue with megabillions and wasteful spending, or billions in spending that promote businesses in other countries. no part of the federal government should be immune from having to save taxpayer money. the american people would be far bet
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
have been over there to try to wipe out al qaeda and the taliban, which has been in league with al qaeda. we have been over there losing american lives and spending american taxpayer dollars to protect our country from another 9/11. to say that we're going to c $1 trillion in the future over the next ten years when we aren't placing the emphasis on what are the conditions on the ground is not sound policy and it's certainly not sound national security policy. so that's illusy. and then the other parts of the cuts that i think are very hard to decipher are cutting waste, fraud and abuse, which we all want t do, but we don't have the guarantee of those cuts. so i think it is important for us to look at the cuts and try to make sure that if we're going to raise the debt ceiling, we raise it only the amount ofhe actual cuts that we can produce. in the majority leader's -- majority leader reid's legislation, there is a joint committee. there is also one in the boehner bill. but in the majority leader's legislation, the committee has to report but its product doesn't have to be passed an
extraordinary. toppling the taliban. training afghan forces. putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure, killing osama bin laden. our troops have battled a brutal insurgency, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it is in their hands. although it does not always make the headlines, every day our forces are serving with distinction in far-flung corners of the world, from western europe to east asia, faced with relentless adversaries. our troops have proven themselves, proven to be a generation of not only warriors but innovators, led by men like admiral mullen, who i have always respected. as i have worked with him every day, i have grown to respect him even more for what he has done. the master new languages, develop and employ advanced new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals. the responsibility has extended beyond the battlefield. i was talking with my good buddy two days ago. it is astounding what you guys have trained these young men and women to do. they not only have to be warriors. they have to be politicia
is training eventual new members of the taliban. he further stated, trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army or police force in afghanistan. the general closed his email to me by saying this, every day someone dies. every day someone dies. it is time to bring our troopings home from -- troops home from afghanistan. how many more children have to cry in a mom or dad's grave site because their mother or daddy went to afghanistan to prop up a corrupt leader named karzai that we send $10 billion a month to? i hope no other children have to cry like edy and stephanie. that brings me to my close, mr. speaker. several weeks oak eugene robertson in his editorial titled "afghanistan strategy, let's go." we wanted to kill or capture osama bin laden, and we did. even so, say the hawks, we have to stay in afghanistan because of the dangerous instability across the border in nuclear armed pakistan. but does anyone believe the war in afghanistan has made pakistan more safe? no, it has not. in fact, it's more fragile now than it's ever been. the threat from afghanistan i
with explosives. the taliban have claimed responsibility for the attacks. there were 19 people killed. among them, pbc says, was one of its reporters, -- bbc says, was one of its reporters, a 25-year- old person who has been with the agency since 2008. those are some headlines from c- span radio. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your chance to talk to, at emailed adn -- your chance to e-mail i and tweet the best-selling author. this weekend, on american history tv on a c-span3, the national portrait gallery celebrates modeled reagan's birthday -- ronald reagan's birthday. then, a stanford university professor, the great migration. we will be in charleston, south carolina, as we look at the city's history, including a talk on the role of the city during the american revolution. get a complete weekend schedule on c-span.org/history. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning, it is "washington journal," connecting you with elected officials, policymakers and journalists. watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and weak dots, hearings and
, please? thank you. guest: recently, one fellow, who is an american, who joined the taliban and is a prominent publicist in some of the al qaeda videos recently told americans to take up a jihad against the united states by going to gun shows and purchasing weapons there. he made the point that many critics of gun control policy have made that guns are easily available there. i think his wording is, "it is well known, so go out there and arm up." mayor michael bloomberg is against guns. he is a member of one of the groups that was spearheading that movement. host: next up from alabama on the independent line. you are on "washington journal." caller: good morning. i would like to comment about guns on college campuses. there was a time in this country when you had high school students with guns in their lockers so they could go to rotc after school. it was not uncommon that a little boy did not have a knife in his show. i am not suggesting a correlation between the two, but crime is higher now than it was then. i am not certain it is all a matter of gun control, but rather as
/11, the al qaeda, telescan thing -- the taliban thing, and now this is a big media thing with it spilling over our borders. it's 2011. we have the technology. we need to secure our borders. beating around the bush is not the problem. it is a south american issue. it is an issue for us. we have to do something about it. host: what is the next chapter when it comes too fast and furious? guest: the next chapter will be the conclusion or the corporate progress of the congressional investigation and the department of justice's and inspector general's report. once these come out and conclude i think we will have a very accurate picture of what fast and furious was all about. there are a lot of blanks that are not filled in yet and i would really caution everyone calling in viewing this show to not rush to judgment on this. do i have told my sources that there are more indictments coming down in this case has not entirely played out yet. there will be higher ups and it will not just be a question of straw purchasers, the smaller fish. the caller did raise a good question about the corruption in
from the terror of the taliban, and afghan forces are taking more responsibility for their security, and he takes with him and memories of americans who have made the old of -- the ultimate sacrifice to make this possible. lee roy gave me the extraordinary privilege of showing me the small plaque bolted to his profit a farm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers from -- goes into his prosthetic arm -- bolted to his prosthetic arm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers. those who did not come back the day. christopher's mother, sister, and grandmother are with us today. i would ask that they stand briefly so we can show our gratitude for their families profound sacrifice. [applause] our heroes are all around us. they are the forces behind the force, like ashley, who during his deployments has kept the family strong, so we are grateful to her and the other armies spouses here. [applause] the military children like britney, austin, reagan, and land in, -- landen, who is there to gently rubbed his hand across arm, so we are there to recognize good children as well. [applause] ou
on fuel and provide more enticing amenities to passengers. from afghanistan, the taliban says that their leader is alive and that a text message an internet posting announcing -- end internet posting announcing his death are fake. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> is weakened on "booktv," on c-span -- and this weekend on "booktv," on c-span2. on afterwards -- "after words," ben mezrich. look for the complete schedule at booktv.org. sign up for our e-mail alerts to get the schedule in your in box. -- inbox. >> "the supreme court" -- the new edition includes an interview with the newest supreme court justice, elena kagen, and you can add -- elena kagan. and you can add to your experience with -- "washington journal" continues. host: as we continue our precision about the debt ceiling and other related issues, we're pleased -- are, were stationed about the debt ceiling and other related issues, we're pleased to be joined by the chief deputy whip on the house side, peter welch. tell us why you voted against cut, cap, and balance ac yest today in the house
have made -- afghan communities now free from the terror of the taliban and afghan forces that are taking more responsibility for their security. and he carries with him the memories of americans who have made the ultimate sacrifice to make this progress possible. earlier in the oval office, leroy gave me the extraordinary privilege of showing me the small plaque that is bolted to his prosthetic arm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers from the 75th regiment. they are, quite literally, part of him, just as they will always be part of america. one of those names is of the ranger who did not come back from the raid that day -- specialist christopher gathercole. christopher's brother and sister and grandmother are here with us today. i would ask that they stand briefly so that we can show our gratitude for their family's profound sacrifice. our heroes are all around us. they're the force behind the force -- military spouses like ashley, who during leroy's many deployments, during missed birthdays and holidays, has kept this family army strong. so we're grateful to you,
members of the taliban. trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army. and, mr. speaker, then, it was kind of sad the way he closed. every day somebody from our country dies. a marine, a soldier, an airman, navy, whatever. mr. speaker, i bring posters on the floor. i have probably 12 now that i want to bring on the floor every time that i speak to remind the house that there's pain in war. the wife to my left on the poster is in tears. the little girl who's about 2 years of age, she doesn't understand why this army officer is kneeling before her with a folded flag. but, yet, i will say to the little girl, when you grow older and you are old enough to know your daddy was a real hero, sergeant jeffrey shear, who gave his life for this country. mr. speaker, that leaves me to sharing with the house an editorial that was written about four weeks ago by eugene robinson and the title is "afghanistan strategy: let's go," and i want to read from his editorial. slinder threads of hope are nice, but they do not constitute a plan, nor do they justify continuing to pour
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